Saturday, August 19, 2017

Helping A Loved One Recover From Alcohol Addiction

When you see someone you love struggling with an addiction to alcohol, helping them recover can be a touchy situation. Seeing a loved one suffer with alcohol addiction can be painful for both you and them, but recovery is not only possible, but within reach as long as you’re willing to help them along the way.

Believe it or not, alcohol is a very powerful drug. While it suppresses the central nervous system, it also makes people feel very relaxed which can lead to some pretty erratic behavior. Look for the following signs in a loved one that may indicate they have an addiction to alcohol:

* Excessive pre-occupation with liquor
* Avoiding activities because they are drunk
* Not wanting to participate in functions that don’t have alcohol available
* Sneaking away for long periods of time and then returning with glazed eyes or erratic behavior
* Slurred words
* Excessively blood shot eyes
* Drinking large amounts of alcohol just so they can get the same feelings

Many people who have an addiction to alcohol will deny they have a problem. As a person who loves them, it’s up to you to help them realize that their drinking is affecting not only their life and their health but that of those around them. An intervention might be necessary to help your loved one realize that they are addicted to alcohol.

Helping a loved one recover from alcohol addiction is a tall order – even for the most experienced person. It takes a lot of strength and a lot of persistence to help your loved one realize that they actually need the help you are offering.

Recovery is a difficult process, but it can be made easier with the support and caring that can be supplied by family and friends. When you are sincere in your effort to help, your loved one has the best chance of recovering from their addiction to alcohol. Often, people with addictions feel alone and unloved. Showing your support can make all the difference in a full recovery.

Your loved one’s addiction to alcohol did not happen overnight. That means that recovery won’t happen overnight either. It takes time, love, understanding, and support. The fact that you have concerns about this person you care about is a huge step forward for them and for you. Once they know they have your unconditional support, they are more likely to step forward and seek recovery.

Helping a loved one recover from alcohol addiction can be a painful process. When you have a sincere desire to help them heal, you will become an integral part of their recovery process. Everyone needs support at some time in their life. There’s never been a better time to offer up YOUR support than helping them recover from an addiction to alcohol!

Addiction – Treatment Is A Choice

People become victims of substance abuse for different and often inscrutable reason. But whatever these reasons are, it is undeniable that this problem wrecks havoc in the lives of its victims and the society. It is proven that there is a connection between the increasing crime rate and substance use. Other than being perpetrators of crimes, people under the influence of substances damage their own health. Cases of drug overdose, alcohol-driven accidents, and infections are common in emergency rooms, hospitals, and sadly, even morgues. But there is still hope for the family, friends, and the addicted individuals. Different addiction treatment programs are launched yearly by the government and other civilian organizations in hopes of promoting a healthier and peaceful society.

But addiction treatment is a delicate issue.

Substance dependents take a long time before accepting that they have a problem. Denial often delays seeking for treatment which often results in growing severity in the dependency. Even family and friends ignore warning signs of drug abuse or alcoholism in their loved ones because they simply can’t accept that the problem exists. Dependents and their families often think that they can solve or stop the habit by themselves. However, substance dependency is not just an excessive physical craving; it is also a psychological problem. Without professional help, the chances of recovery and avoiding relapse are very low to none.

Admittedly, there is no permanent cure for addiction. Recovery and treatment are continuos and life-long processes. But there are several ways to considerably lighten the burden. Support groups like Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, and community organizations with treatment programs guide dependents to recovery.

In joining these groups, dependents get the chance to relate and share experiences with persons battling the same problem. These groups are also facilitated by people who are experts in substance abuse counseling. A common practice in these groups is the surrender of the dependents to Higher Powers which guide them through the process. Dependents who undergo this form of recovery describe it as deeply spiritual and life-changing.

If surrendering oneself to another is not the dependent’s cup of tea, there is another treatment program that banks on individual power. The SMART Recovery addiction treatment rejects the Higher Power but instead urges individuals to find within themselves the strength to overcome their problem.

The treatment is abstinence-based – the individual has the competency to choose a better life over the substance he is addicted to.

No matter what form of addiction treatment a dependent follows, it is important to emphasize that no one becomes sober overnight. It is also important to stress that relapse is still a strong possibility. Substance abuse programs are only there to help, not to cure. Having a better life is a choice dependents have to make for themselves.

How To Convince A Smoker To Quit: Timing

Smoking is an addiction. That sounds like a simple statement that can be taken as read, but when you are trying to convince a smoker to quit, it’s something you really need to understand. Smoking is often referred to as a ‘habit’, when in reality the stronger term ‘addiction’ is far more realistic. Smokers become physically addicted to nicotine, the chemical found in cigarettes, and can experience uncomfortable and often painful physical symptoms of withdrawal when they try to quit.

The reason this is pointed out is that convincing someone to quit smoking for good is a difficult road, and only by understanding what you are actually dealing with can you have a chance of beating it. A tiny percentage of smokers – less than 10% – manage to quit on their first attempt. Most will take three or more attempts, and some may take over 10 attempts over a number of years to finally kick the addiction for good.

If you are struggling to support a smoker who continually goes back on their word – in your eyes – and starts smoking again, try and keep positive. Acknowledge, both to them and to yourself, that this is a marathon rather than a sprint, and by being continually upbeat your smoking friend or family member can be assured of your support.

Never, ever cast doubt on a smokers desire to quit just because they have failed before – doing so can make them angry, defiant and less likely to quit than ever before. Keep things in perspective, and see every failed attempt as one step closer to the final, successful, smoke-free life.